How to Ensure You’re Safely Serving and Preparing Eggs

Eggs are essential ingredients in a number of dishes, but they can also be dangerous to your health if handled incorrectly. To reduce your risk of salmonella and other diseases that come from eggs, follow these important guidelines.

  1. Shop smart. The first step toward healthy egg care is inspecting your eggs in the grocery store for cracks or dirty appearance. Also be sure to only purchase eggs that are stored in a refrigerated case.
  2. Store them properly. Eggs should be stored in a clean spot in the refrigerator at 40°F or lower.
  3. Cook them thoroughly. If you’re preparing scrambled eggs or another egg dish, be sure that both the yolk and white are firm and that the egg reaches a temperature of 160°F. Never eat batter or dough containing raw eggs before it's cooked or baked.
  4. Store egg dishes properly. Dishes made of only eggs cannot be stored, so be sure to eat them immediately after cooking. If you prepare something else that contains eggs, always keep it refrigerated.
  5. Keep it clean. Even if you use the utmost care when handling eggs, it’s essential to wash your hands, cooking and prep surfaces, and any utensils thoroughly to remove any traces of eggs. Wash hands and utensils with hot, soapy water, and scrub kitchen countertops with bleach or another germ-killing product.

Playing It Safe With Eggs [FDA]
Eggs & Food Safety [Incredible Egg]
Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Salmonella from Eggs [CDC]

What Are Your Tips for Cooking the Perfect Omelet?

Omelets are seemingly simple breakfast foods that are deceptively difficult to make. If you’re all too accustomed to overcooked, broken omelets, these seven expert tips will help show you how to flip one like a pro. And if you have your own omelet cooking tips, be sure to share them!

  1. Use the proper tools. For best results, use a skillet that’s 8 or 9 inches in diameter, plus a heatproof spatula and an egg whisk.
  2. Assemble the ingredients. A standard omelet uses two or three eggs per person, as well as whichever veggies, meats, or cheeses that you prefer. Be sure to chop and prepare your toppings in advance!
  3. Add a splash of water to your eggs. Before adding the other ingredients, whisk a splash of water into the eggs. This will help ensure a light, fluffy omelet.
  4. Heat the skillet. Heat your skillet to medium-high heat and coat the bottom with unsalted butter.
  5. Add the eggs. Add just the eggs to the pan first and let the edges set for about 10 seconds. Pull the now-set edges in toward the center and rotate the pan to disperse the raw egg.
  6. Add toppings. Gently sprinkle the toppings on the surface of the eggs.
  7. Fold. Fold only one side of the omelet in toward the center. Once it’s done cooking, fold the other side by tilting the skillet. Flip the whole thing face down onto your plate to complete the perfect omelet.

How to Make the Perfect Omelet [Food Network]
How to Make the 'Perfect' French Omelet [Instructables]
How to Make an Omelet [Organic Valley]

5 Appetizing Apple Crisp Recipes

From the cold winter months to hot summer days, apple crisp is a sweet, rustic treat that makes a perfect dessert any time of the year. The sweet apples and gooey cinnamon sauce complement the crunchy crust, and apple crisp tastes even more wonderful when topped with cold vanilla ice cream.

There are a number of different ways to make this delicious dish, from quick, simple recipes to elegant creations ideal for dinner parties. Here are some favorite apple crisp recipes that you can make right in your own kitchen.

Apple Crisp II [All Recipes]

Betty Crocker’s Apple Crisp [Betty Crocker]

Easy Apple Crisp with Oatmeal Streusel [Chow]

Apple Crisp with Oat Topping [Southern Food]

The Divinest Apple Crisp Ever [Architect Mom]

Keep Food Fresh Longer With These Fridge Organization Tips

Although your refrigerator is probably the last place in your house that you would think to organize, there are actually a number of reasons that this is beneficial to both your kitchen and your wallet. Organizing your refrigerated food can help to make it last longer, which will help you to maximize your weekly trip to the grocery store and keep your family healthy. Here are a few smart ways to organize your fridge.

  1. Keep less sensitive items on the door. Only store condiments and other things that won’t go bad as quickly on the door, as this is the warmest place in the refrigerator.
  2. Store raw meats at the bottom. One of the most important things to consider when storing food in the refrigerator is cross-contamination. You want to store raw meats in a way that they won’t risk touching or dripping onto other foods, so place them as close to the bottom of the refrigerator as possible.
  3. Store fruit in a separate drawer. Because many fruits contain gases that cause vegetables to rot, store the two types of produce away from one another in separate drawers.
  4. Keep milk toward the back of the refrigerator. The back of the bottom shelf is the coldest place in the fridge, so this is where you should store delicate milk.

How to Organize Your Refrigerator Drawers and Shelves [Real Simple]
The Best Way to Organize Your Refrigerator [The Kitchn]
Here's The Right Way To Organize Your Refrigerator [Business Insider]

Think Beyond Citrus With These Surprising Sources of Vitamin C

You probably remember your parents telling you to drink orange juice as a child because it provided you with Vitamin C, but do you really understand the benefits of this miracle vitamin? Vitamin C boosts your immune system to prevent you from getting sick, and it provides beneficial antioxidants that keep you looking and feeling your best. Here are a few lesser-known sources of Vitamin C.

  1. Red bell peppers. One small red bell pepper actually provides even more Vitamin C than a cup of orange juice, and it contains only four grams of the carbohydrates that many citrus fruits are high in. In fact, a juicy bell pepper actually provides 203% of your recommended daily value of Vitamin C.
  2. Strawberries. If you want to extend your Vitamin C search to fruits outside of the citrus family, strawberries are a great option. One cup contains 97.6 milligrams of Vitamin C, which is about 130% of your daily value. Even more conveniently, the same amount of frozen strawberries offers 105.6 milligrams of beneficial C vitamins.

10 Surprising Sources of Vitamin C [Doctor Oz]
Surprising Sources of Vitamin C [d Life]

Decode That Recipe With This Glossary of Common Cooking Terms

Even the most experienced chef gets stumped by a recipe every now and then. To prevent road blocks during your next cooking session, memorize these three common cooking terms.

Baste
You've probably come across this term when cooking that Thanksgiving turkey. Simply put, to baste is to keep meat or other foods moist during the cooking process by spooning over a sauce, water, or its own juices. This adds flavor, while preventing the meat from drying out.

Roux
Used as the foundation of thicker sauces and gravies, a roux is a mixture of equal parts butter and flour that's stirred constantly over low heat until smooth.

Macerate
Commonly applied to dessert recipes, macerating entails covering fruits or veggies in liquid, then letting them marinate until the fruits and veggies soften and the liquid's flavor has been absorbed. Said liquid is typically a mixture of lemon juice and sugar.

Cooking Terms [Recipe Goldmine]
The Basic Kitchen: Glossary of Cooking Terms [Les Petites Gourmettes]
Glossary of Cooking Terms [BHG]
Glossary of Cooking Terms [Cookery]

6 Healthy Garlic Recipes With Big Flavor

Garlic is a superfood that’s full of healthful properties. Garlic adds robust flavor and dimension to any dish, and there’s scientific evidence that it helps to prevent many types of cancers. Whether you press your own fresh garlic or use canned, minced versions, it’s an important seasoning to keep on hand. Here are a few great recipes with savory, garlicky tastes.

Asparagus with Anchovies and Garlic
This one is a nutritious side dish with a similar flavor to a Caesar salad, and it perfectly complements grilled chicken or fish.

Brazilian Grilled Flank Steak
Grill up this steak recipe in just 30 minutes for a flavorful entrée with a bold garlic flavor.

Mashed Red Potatoes with Garlic and Parmesan
Garlic is a necessity in mashed potatoes, and this recipe adds even more flavor with the addition of zesty Parmesan cheese.

4 Minute Spicy Garlic Shrimp
Combine Jumbo shrimp with lemon, red pepper and garlic cloves for a fresh and healthy summer dish.

Creamy Garlic Penne Pasta
The creamy garlic and cheese sauce on this hearty pasta makes a perfect comfort food that the whole family will love.

Chicken Garlic Bites
These small chicken hors d’oeuvres have a big garlic flavor and can be accentuated with a variety of dipping sauces.

Public Domain/Public Domain

Fascinating Websites for Foodies

For devoted foodies, enjoying food is about much more than just eating. Cooking, mixing drinks, baking, and learning about the origins of every ingredient are all important aspects for getting most out of every dish, and these informative websites are devoted to the culture of food.

Chow
Have you ever wanted to learn to make your own vanilla extract? Or to find the best culinary creations available at your local gas station? What about how to tell if your turkey is done? Chow is an elaborate website devoted to all of your most pressing foodie questions and creative recipes that you've never thought to try, from the perfect Brandy Alexander cocktail to halibut puttanesca. It also features a discussion board where you can connect with other foodies to talk about cooking techniques, restaurants, and other culinary concerns.

Cheese.com
This website is a cheese-lover's paradise, full of every type of cheese imaginable and the various ways to cook with them. Browse the site by texture, milk, country, or type, and even search vegetarian cheeses as alternatives to contemporary favorites. Cheese.com even includes serving and storage advice, cutting tips, and the perfect wine pairings for any cheese you choose.

Public Domain/Public Domain

Find Recipes Online with These Websites

These days, finding and sharing recipes has become an online activity, with dozens of websites full of user submitted meals for lunch, dinner and even dessert. These helpful websites will help you with your own family’s meal planning, as well as connect you to other home chefs to trade tips and tricks.

All Recipes
All Recipes is one of the most popular online cooking resources, with an expansive recipe database for just about any meal or occasion. Search the archives by ingredient, watch video tutorials, view sample menus for the entire week, or even plan your holiday spread all on this simple, friendly website.

Epicurious
The ideal site for the passionate food lover, Epicurious is jam packed with creative, inspiring recipes in the form of traditional text, videos, and slideshows of mouth-watering photos. Epicurious also features a great online community where visitors can follow other members, post their favorite recipes, and discuss topics such as family meal solutions and home brewing techniques. 

FoodNetwork.com
The beloved television cooking channel has a corresponding website, and fans of shows like The Barefoot Contessa are sure to love it. FoodNetwork.com features cooking tips from top chefs and hosts, 30-minute meal recipes, a quick recipe finder with filters for ingredients and prep time, and even a blog full of articles that foodies will find fascinating.

Find Local Food in Season Near You

Finding fresh, healthy foods nearby can extend beyond the produce counter at your neighborhood grocery store. If you want find food grown in your region, these three websites can help guide you:

Local Harvest
The CSA page of the Local Harvest website gives you complete information about signing up for a CSA, and where to find one in your area. CSA stands for “Community Supported Agriculture”, and it generally operates like a subscription to your local farmers market. If you want a constant supply of fresh, local produce, Local Harvest is worth a read.

FarmersMarket.com
FarmersMarket.com is an entire website devoted to, you guessed it, farmer’s markets. Type in your zip code and you’ll instantly receive information about all of the farmer’s markets in your area, giving you quick and easy access to information about local and organic products. FarmersMarket.com also has an informative blog with tips and recipes for using your market purchases in healthy and delicious ways.

Epicurious
This self-described website “for people who love to eat” features information about farm-to-table meats and produce and where to find them in your area, including an interactive ingredient map. Epicurious also employs healthy, seasonal recipes, a tight-knit online community, and articles from chefs and other experts to keep you informed about local foods.

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